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haytor

haytor rock

 Haytor Rock                                 haytor rock haytor rock

Welcome to Haytor Rock

Over the years Haytor has become quite a tourist attraction with thousands of people visiting every week. It is one of Dartmoor's main trade mark's. It can be seen from many miles around.

If you've been there, you'll know how spectacular it is and please leave a guestbook entry and if you have any special photos of Haytor - with or without friends and family please submit them in our gallery! The best photo's will be featured in a special section! The sites at Haytor Rock are breath-taking with views for many miles around.

Haytor or Hay Tor is a granite tor on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. It is at grid reference SX 757 770. It is near the village of Haytor Vale in the parish of Ilsington. Until the late 18th century Haytor was known as Itterdown, and should not be confused with older hundred of Heytor which covers the coastal area between the River Teign and River Dart.

Haytor (and the immediately adjacent Haytor Rocks) is a natural beauty spot popular with coach parties and walking groups. It is easily accessible by road. At a height of 457 metres and situated right on the eastern side of the moor, it provides excellent views of the coastline, the Teign estuary and the rolling countryside between, with the ridge of Haldon behind. See what you can pick out in the distance!

haytor

 

Haytor and Haytor Rocks together form a typical "avenue" tor, where the granite between the two main outcrops has been eroded away. Its characteristic shape is a notable landmark visible on the skyline from many places between Exeter and Totnes. Haytor is also a climbing venue, especially popular with groups and schools due to its generally easy grades. The granite here is of a particularly high quality and there are several disused quarries near the tor, the rock from which was transported by the Haytor Granite Tramway (built in 1820) to the Stover Canal.

The tramway itself was built out of the granite it would carry, and due to its durable nature much of it remains visible today.

Granite from the quarry was also used in the construction of London Bridge which was built in 1831, however by 1962 the bridge was sinking and had to be replaced. The last rock was quarried here in 1919; it was used for the Exeter war memorial.

During the 19th Century steps were cut into one side on the Tor and a metal handrail fixed to allow tourists easier access to the summit. This was not entirely welcomed and in 1851, a Dr Coker complained about the rock steps that had been cut 'to enable the enervated and pinguitudinous scions of humanity of this wonderful nineteenth century to gain its summit.' It is possible that the steps were cut by John Yabsley, stone mason from Halwell.

"Hey Tor, which derives its name from heah, high, is perhaps, visited more often than any other tor upon Dartmoor. This is due not only to the fact that it is easily accessible - the 'cherrybanks' of Bovey Tracey taking it in their round - but to the gigantic masses of rock which crown its summit, the largest piles, taken as a whole, upon the moor and the most unmistakeable."

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Check out Roadford Lake - a beautiful reservoir in Devon

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